Archive of Retina MacBook Pro Rumors

2018 MacBook Pro models feature the biggest yearly CPU performance gains since 2011, according to Geekbench founder John Poole.


Geekbench 4 scores indicate the latest 15-inch models have a 12 to 15 percent increase in single-core performance, while multi-core performance is up 39 to 46 percent, compared to the equivalent 2017 models.

A new 15-inch MacBook Pro with the best-available 2.9GHz six-core Intel Core i9 processor, with Turbo Boost up to 4.8GHz, has a multi-core score of 22,439, for example, a 44.3 percent increase versus a 2017 model with a then-best 3.1GHz quad-core Core i7 and Turbo Boost up to 4.1GHz.


Likewise, for the latest 13-inch models, Geekbench scores show a 3 to 11 percent increase in single-core performance, and an impressive 81 to 86 percent increase in multi-core performance versus equivalent 2017 models.

A new 13-inch MacBook Pro with the best-available 2.7GHz quad-core Intel Core i7 processor, with Turbo Boost up to 4.5GHz, has a multi-core score of 17,557, for example, an 83.8 percent increase versus a 2017 model with a then-best 3.5GHz dual-core Core i7 and Turbo Boost up to 4.0GHz.


Poole attributes the increases in performance to additional cores, higher Turbo Boost frequencies, and the switch to DDR4 memory.

2018 MacBook Pro models feature eighth-generation Intel Core processors, with up to six cores on 15-inch models and up to four cores on 13-inch models, both firsts. The refresh marked the first increase in cores since 2011, when the first quad-core 15-inch MacBook Pro models were released.

Interestingly, as Poole notes, the new 13-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar models are now competitive with 15-inch models from 2017 in both single-core and multi-core performance, essentially making it a smaller replacement.

Poole also notes that these Geekbench scores are preliminary, and likely to rise over the coming weeks, as on brand new machines, macOS completes several setup tasks in the background that can temporarily degrade performance. He says these tasks vary and can take up to several days to be completed.

Apple advertises the new 15-inch MacBook Pro as up to 70 percent faster, and the new 13-inch model as up to two times faster, than the equivalent 2017 models, but Poole told MacRumors that other benchmarks may show different results than Geekbench. Performance in real-world usage will also vary.

Geekbench 4 is a popular cross-platform CPU and GPU benchmark from Primate Labs, with apps available for Mac and iPhone and iPad.
Apple retail stores in the United States have received supplies of the new 2018 MacBook Pro models, which means stock configurations are available for in-store pickup and walk-in purchase as of today.

Both 13 and 15-inch models are available in many Apple retail stores around the country, but not all stores appear to have full stock at this time.


When the MacBook Pro was announced on Thursday, Apple said the new machines would be in retail stores later this week. The first orders placed on Thursday have also started arriving to customers, with Apple shipping some out as early as Friday.

In addition to the United States, the new 13-inch MacBook Pro is also available for in-store pickup in the UK, Germany, and France, but retail locations don't yet appear to be stocking the 15-inch model. In-store pickup is not yet available in Canada, Australia, or countries in Asia.

Pricing on the new 13-inch MacBook Pro begins at $1,799 for the entry-level 13-inch model with a 2.3GHz 8th-generation quad-core Core i5 chip, Intel Iris Plus Graphics 655, 8GB RAM, and a 256GB SSD.

Pricing for the 15-inch MacBook Pro starts at $2,399 for a 2.3GHz 6-core 8th-generation Core i7 chip, a Radeon Pro 555X graphics card, 16GB RAM, and a 256GB SSD.

Beyond the two stock 13 and 15-inch models, there are several customization options available for an additional price, with the top of the line 13-inch model priced at $3,699 for a 2.7GHz Core i7 processor, 16GB RAM, and a 2TB SSD.

The ultimate 15-inch MacBook Pro is priced at $6,699 for a 2.9GHz Core i9 processor, a Radeon Pro 560X, 32GB RAM, and a 4TB SSD.

Custom configurations are not generally in stock at most Apple retail stores and will need to be custom ordered from Apple's website. Custom orders placed today will arrive in approximately 10 days.
Apple has outlined repair options and parts availability for the new 2018 MacBook Pro in an internal document distributed to Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers on Friday and obtained by MacRumors.


If a defective 2018 MacBook Pro is taken to an Apple Store, the Genius Bar will be able to mail it to an off-site Apple Repair Center, which will be able to repair minor components beginning in late July, and major components beginning in late September, according to the document, which doesn't specify the minor-major distinction.

Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers will only be able to perform limited on-site repairs until service inventory of replacement parts becomes available, as is often the case with a new Apple product:
  • Apple says the new 13-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar models have a "new" power adapter, with replacements available in late July. The adapter is still 61W, according to Apple's website, and its external design seems to remain the same, so any potential changes may be internal.
  • Keycap kits will be available in mid-August. Hopefully they will be needed less, as iFixit discovered the 2018 MacBook Pro has a thin, silicone barrier underneath each key, which they believe is to prevent dust and other particulates from causing keys to stick, repeat, or function inconsistently. Apple hasn't confirmed that theory, only saying the third-generation keyboards are quieter.
  • Other service parts will be available in late September.
MacRumors received this information from a reliable source, but repair options and service parts availability may vary based on store or repair shop, region, and so forth. These are only guidelines that are subject to change.

To initiate a repair, head to the Contact Apple Support portal, select Mac → Mac notebooks, select the category and type of issue, select Bring in for Repair, and book an appointment with an Apple Store or Apple Authorized Service Provider. There are also phone, chat, and email options for troubleshooting.
The keys of the new 2018 MacBook Pro, which uses a third-generation butterfly keyboard, appear to be cocooned in a "thin, silicone barrier" according to a teardown that's underway over at iFixit.

According to iFixit, the quieter typing Apple has been advertising in the 2018 MacBook Pro models is a side effect of the new membrane, which the site believes is actually an "ingress-proofing measure" to prevent the butterfly keys from seizing up when exposed to dust and other small particulates.


To back up its claim, iFixit points towards a patent for the technology Apple may be using in the third-generation butterfly keyboard, which describes a "guard structure" that keeps direct contaminants away from the movement mechanism.

iFixit does warn, however, that while the silicone barrier is clearly in place, there's no way to definitively prove that it's a reliability fix rather than just a sound damping measure, citing statements from Apple to The Verge that have said the new keyboard design wasn't introduced to "solve [dust] issues." Apple also told The Verge and other sites that the issue in question has only impacted a small number of customers.

iFixit speculates that Apple is avoiding sharing the complete reasoning behind the keyboard redesign because of the class action lawsuits that it's currently facing over faulty 2016/2017 MacBook Pro keyboards.
Apple is in the middle of several class-action lawsuits for the failure of their keyboards, so of course they can’t just come out and say, "Hey, we fixed it!” That says there was a problem to begin with. But you’ve heard that clever analysis from John Gruber already. I’m just here to posit: the advertised boost in quietude is a side-effect of this rubbery membrane. The quiet angle is, quite literally, a cover up.
Since Apple unveiled the 2018 MacBook Pro with its third-generation butterfly keyboard, there have been questions about whether specific changes were made to address keyboard failure issues present in 2016 and 2017 MacBook Pro models.

Apple has been vague when answering questions about the way the quieter keys were implemented and if those changes also impact durability and reliability, but iFixit's teardown offers hope for customers who have been waiting for Apple to fix the keyboard problems affecting older MacBook Pro models.

Some 2016 and 2017 MacBook Pro owners have experienced issues with sticky, unresponsive, or repeating keys, leading to significant public outcry that eventually pushed Apple to launch a free repair program for those machines. As a result of the attention given to the issue, some customers have been wary about purchasing a new MacBook Pro because of possible future problems.

Future failure rates and anecdotal reports may be the only way to determine the true purpose behind the silicone barrier added to the keys, as Apple's marketing materials insist the change has been introduced to allow for a quieter typing experience, addressing an issue that few people seemed to have had with the 2016/2017 keyboard.

Earlier today, TechCrunch shared a video demonstrating the typing sound of the new 2018 MacBook Pro compared to an earlier MacBook Pro model, confirming that it is indeed quieter as Apple says. Multiple hands-on reports have also said there's a noticeable difference between the sound of the new MacBook Pro and older models.

iFixit plans to continue on with its teardown next week and may have more information to share, but given the interest in the third-generation butterfly keyboard, the site didn't want to wait to highlight potential good news.
Apple's new 2018 MacBook Pro models feature a third-generation butterfly keyboard, which Apple says has been improved for a "quieter typing experience."

The difference in sound between the quieter 2018 MacBook Pro keyboard and the older butterfly keyboard in an earlier version of the MacBook Pro has been demoed in video by TechCrunch, with the difference in sound clearly audible.


The sound coming from the 2018 MacBook Pro keyboard is noticeably muffled compared to the sound coming from the previous-generation MacBook Pro, which, as TechCrunch points out, sounds much more like a typewriter.

Multiple hands-on experiences with the 2018 MacBook Pro shared by various media sites yesterday have also confirmed that the new third-generation butterfly keyboard is a good deal quieter than previous keyboards.


When it comes to feel, though, reviews have said that the keyboard doesn't feel any different, as it's using the same butterfly switches with the same amount of key travel.

According to Apple, the focus with the third-generation keyboard was dampening key sounds, and the company has not confirmed if specific changes were made to address keyboard failure issues present in 2016 and 2017 MacBook Pro models.

Some 2016 and 2017 MacBook Pro owners have experienced issues with sticky, unresponsive, or repeating keys, leading Apple to launch a repair program for those machines. Apple is offering free repairs for affected MacBook Pro models, but it continues to be unclear if design changes have been implemented to prevent the issue, both in earlier machines and the new 2018 machines.

More information will be available on the 2018 MacBook Pro keyboard when it's unveiled through the teardowns that should be coming soon.
The 2018 MacBook Pros just went on sale yesterday, but Apple was quick about shipping them out and some customers already have the new machines in hand.

Laptop Mag was able to get one of the new 13-inch 2018 MacBook Pro models and performed some benchmarks to give us an idea of how it measures up to competing PCs. According to Laptop Mag, it the new 13-inch MacBook Pro is the "fastest system in its class."


The site's tests were performed on the $2,499 13-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar equipped with a 2.7GHz quad-core 8th-generation Core i7 processor, 16GB RAM, Intel Iris Plus 655, and a 512GB SSD.

A file copy test of the SSD in the new MacBook Pro, which Apple says supports sequential read speeds of up to 3.2GB/s and sequential write speeds up to 2.2GB/s, led Laptop Mag to declare the SSD in the MacBook Pro "the fastest ever" in a laptop. Higher capacity SSDs may see even faster speeds on disk speeds tests. A BlackMagic Disk Speed test was also conducted, resulting in an average write speed of 2,682 MB/s.

I had to do a double take when I saw how quickly the new 13-inch MacBook Pro duplicated 4.9GB worth of data. It took 2 seconds, which comes out to a rate of 2,519 megabytes per second. That's insane.

So we also ran the BlackMagic Disk Speed test for macOS, and the system returned an average write speed of 2,682 MBps.

To be fair, Apple’s relatively new APFS file system is designed to speed up file copies using a technology Apple calls Instant Cloning. But a win is a win.
On a Geekbench 4 CPU benchmark, the 13-inch MacBook Pro earned a score of 18,055 on the multi-core test, outperforming 13-inch machines from companies like Dell, HP, Asus, and Microsoft. That score beats out all 2017 MacBook Pro models and is faster than some iMac configurations. 15-inch MacBook Pro models with 6-core 8th-generation Intel chips will show even more impressive speeds.


The MacBook Pro took 16:57 minutes to transcode a 4K video clip to 1080p using Handbrake, faster than most competing machines and two and a half minutes faster than the 2017 13-inch MacBook Pro. It didn't win at an Excel VLOOKUP macro matching 65,000 names to corresponding addresses, but at 1 minute 16 seconds to complete the task, it was competitive with the Dell XPS 13 and Asus Zenbook, while beating out the Surface Book 2 and the Huawei MateBook X Pro.

One area where the MacBook Pro didn't quite measure up to other machines with similar specs was GPU performance. The 13-inch 2018 MacBook Pro uses Intel's Iris Plus Graphics 655 with 128MB of embedded DRAM and was unable to compete in a Dirt 3 graphics test, getting only 38.8 frames per second. All Windows-based machines tested offered much better performance.


Apple did team up with Blackmagic to offer a Blackmagic eGPU for gaming purposes and system intensive creative tasks, but the device is priced at $700. It does, however, offer super fast performance with a built-in Radeon Pro 580 GPU.

Additional benchmarks and details about the 2018 MacBook Pro models will surface over the course of the next few days as orders arrive and retail stores begin stocking the machines.

The new 2018 models can be purchased from the Apple online store, with prices on the 13-inch machine starting at $1,799 and prices on the 15-inch machine starting at $2,399.
When using certain external monitors with the new 2018 MacBook Pro models, the built-in True Tone feature that matches the color of the MacBook Pro's screen to the ambient lighting in a room will also extend to the connected display.

According to a support document published this morning by Apple, True Tone can adjust the Apple Thunderbolt Display using an Apple Thunderbolt 3 to Thunderbolt 2 adapter, the LG UltraFine 5K Display, and the LG UltraFine 4K display.


When using these displays, you can activate or deactivate True Tone by clicking on the Apple logo in the menu bar, opening up System Preferences, choosing the Displays section, selecting the Display tab and then selecting or unselecting the True Tone checkbox.


With other third-party monitors, True Tone will not be an available option.

True Tone, first introduced on the iPad Pro and then the iPhone X, uses the sensors in the MacBook Pro to measure the white balance in the room, adjusting the tone of the display for a more natural viewing experience.


True Tone can cut down on eyestrain and it allows for a more paper-like look for websites, documents, and more.

The True Tone feature is available in the new 13 and 15-inch 2018 MacBook Pro models, which Apple unveiled yesterday. You can purchase the new machines from the Apple online store, with stock configurations set to arrive in just a few days after purchase.
Customers who ordered one of the new 2018 MacBook Pro models that Apple released this morning are starting to see shipment notifications with the first deliveries of stock configurations slated for tomorrow.

As noted by 9to5Mac, customers have had their cards charged, and orders started shifting to preparing for shipment earlier today before some new machines were sent out by Apple.


Apple's delivery estimates when placing an order suggest the new 2018 MacBook Pro models won't deliver until July 16 at the earliest, which is next Monday, but some customers will be getting deliveries early.

Custom configurations for both 13 and 15-inch machines will not be arriving until next week, however, with build-to-order machines listing delivery dates between July 19 and July 23 for the most part.

In-store pickup for stock machines is not yet available, but Apple says the new models will be available in retail stores "later this week."

The new MacBook Pro models feature 8th-generation Coffee Lake chips with quad-core chips in the 13-inch models and 6-core chips in the 15-inch models, up to 32GB of RAM for the 15-inch MacBook Pro, a T2 chip for enhanced security and "Hey Siri" support, a quieter third-generation butterfly keyboard, True Tone for both the display and the Touch Bar, and up to 4TB of SSD storage.
Apple today introduced new 13-inch and 15-inch MacBook Pro with Touch Bar models, now available to order from its online store.


As with any new product launch, there is a wealth of information to sift through, so we've created a list of key takeaways about the 2018 MacBook Pro lineup, particularly as it compares to the 2017 MacBook Pro lineup.
  • 2018 MacBook Pros feature eighth-generation Intel Core processors. Apple says the 15-inch model is up to 70 percent faster, and the 13-inch model is up to two times faster, than the equivalent 2017 models with seventh-generation Intel Core processors in benchmarks.

    15-inch models can now be maxed out with a 2.9GHz six-core Core i9 processor, while the previous generation topped out at a 3.1GHz quad-core Core i7. Quad-core 13-inch models with the Touch Bar are now available, up to 2.7GHz, while 2017 models were dual-core up to 3.5GHz.

  • 15-inch models have much-requested support for up to 32GB of DDR4 RAM, compared to 16GB of LPDDR3 RAM on 2017 models, accommodated by a 10 percent increase in the battery's watt-hour rating. Overall battery life remains up to 10 hours per full charge.

  • AMD's Radeon Pro graphics cards now come with 4GB of GDDR5 memory standard on 15-inch models, while 13-inch models now have 128MB of embedded DRAM, compared to 64MB on 2017 models.

  • 2018 MacBook Pros have an Apple T2 chip with "Hey Siri" support, versus an Apple T1 chip in 2017 models. The T2 chip integrates several previously separate components, including the system management controller, image signal processor, audio controller, and SSD controller.

  • Apple now offers doubled SSD storage capacities of up to 2TB for 13-inch models and up to 4TB for 15-inch models, compared to up to 1TB for 13-inch models and up to 2TB for 15-inch models in 2017.

  • 2018 MacBook Pros now feature True Tone displays, including the Touch Bar, on 13-inch and 15-inch models. Like the latest iPhone and iPad displays, the white balance automatically adjusts to match the color temperature of the light around you for a more natural viewing experience.

  • 2018 MacBook Pros now feature an "improved third-generation keyboard for quieter typing," but they still use butterfly switches, and it's unclear if the new keyboard addresses the issues with sticky, repeating, or unresponsive keys that prompted Apple's new service program.

  • 2018 MacBook Pros feature Bluetooth 5.0, up from Bluetooth 4.2. 802.11ac Wi-Fi remains unchanged.

  • 2018 MacBook Pro models have the same overall design and I/O as their 2017 equivalents, with four Thunderbolt 3 ports, a 3.5mm headphone jack, Space Gray or Silver finishes, and so forth. 13-inch model still weighs three pounds, and 15-inch still weighs four.

  • 2018 MacBook Pros also have unchanged display resolutions of 2880×1800 for 15-inch models and 2560×1600 for 13-inch models.

  • 13-inch models start at $1,799 and 15-inch models start at $2,399 in the United States, the same pricing as 2017 models. However, configure-to-order prices top out higher, primarily due to larger storage options.

  • 13-inch MacBook Pro models without the Touch Bar were not refreshed today.
MacRumors will have continued coverage of the new MacBook Pro lineup throughout the week, so keep checking back.
If you recently purchased a 2017 MacBook Pro prior to today's announcement of the new 2018 models, it's possible that Apple might allow you to return the machine for one of the updated 2018 MacBook Pros.

There's a two-week return policy on all Apple products, so if your 2017 MacBook Pro was purchased within the last 14 calendar days, you can return it no questions asked to purchase a new 2018 MacBook Pro instead.


If it's been longer than two weeks, there's still a chance Apple will let you make an exchange. A Reddit user purchased a new 2017 MacBook Pro a month ago, and took it to the Apple Store to see if he could return it to purchase a new model and to take advantage of the current Back to School sale offering free Beats headphones.

The Apple employee he spoke with did indeed let him return the 2017 machine that was purchased 30 days ago.
I explained my situation and how I saw that they just released the new machines today along with the Beats deal and asked if they might have some mercy for me and let me exchange it for the new one or at least get free Beats. The guy I spoke too said he completely understood my situation and had been there himself, he let me refund my 2017 MBP completely on the spot without even a receipt and told me the cash will be back to me in 2-3 days, at which point I can reorder the new one from the education store for the same price I did before and get my Beats.

In the past, Apple has been generous with returns when new Mac models are released, so it's no surprise that at least one person has been able to exchange a month-old machine for the newer 2018 model.

It's not store policy to allow for exchanges after 14 calendar days though, so while it's absolutely worth visiting an Apple Store to plead your case for a return if you purchased a 2017 MacBook Pro in the last month or so, there's no guarantee that your local store will allow it.

In situations like these, the decisions are left up to the employees at each individual store, so your experience may differ than the Reddit user who was able to get a refund.

The new 2018 13 and 15-inch MacBook Pro models feature 8th-generation Coffee Lake processors from Intel which bring major speed improvements, up to 32GB RAM (15-inch MacBook Pro), up to 4TB of solid state storage, Retina displays with True Tone, revamped keyboards with quieter keys, and a T2 chip for improved security and hands-free "Hey Siri" functionality.
Apple's new MacBook Pro models come with faster processors, more maximum RAM, and higher capacity SSDs all aimed at Apple's professional users, but none of those upgrades come cheap.

Base prices for the 13 and 15-inch MacBook Pro models are unchanged from last year, with pricing on new 13-inch models starting at $1,799 and pricing on new 15-inch models starting at $2,399, but build-to-order customizations can tack on thousands of dollars.


The maximum stock $2,799 15-inch MacBook Pro ships with 16GB RAM, a 512GB SSD, a Radeon Pro 560X graphics card, and a 6-core 2.6GHz Core i7 processor, but with upgrades, an ultimate machine with top-of-the-line components costs $6,699.

That includes an additional $300 to upgrade to a 2.9GHz 6-core Core i9 processor, $400 to upgrade to 32GB RAM, and $3,200 to upgrade to the 4TB SSD.

Comparatively, a maxed out 2017 15-inch MacBook Pro was priced at $4,199 for a 3.1GHz Core i7 processor and a 2TB SSD.

It's the new 4TB SSD upgrade that's the most expensive, with Apple also offering more affordable 1TB and 2TB upgrades, for $400 and $1,200, respectively. Last year's 2017 MacBook Pro models maxed out at 2TB of storage rather than 4TB, and didn't offer RAM upgrades.

The highest-end stock 13-inch 2018 MacBook Pro with 2.3GHz quad-core Core i5 processor, Intel Iris Plus Graphics 655, 8GB RAM, and a 512GB SSD is priced at $1,999, but a fully maxed out machine will cost $3,699.


That's an additional $200 for a 2.7GHz quad-core Core i7 processor, $200 for 16GB RAM, and a 2TB SSD for $1,200. 16GB RAM and a 2TB SSD are the maximum options for the 13-inch machine, with a 1TB SSD also available for $400.

In 2017, a fully upgraded 13-inch MacBook Pro was priced at $2,899 for a 3.5GHz Core i7 processor, 16GB RAM, and a 1TB SSD.

If you skip out on the SSD upgrades in the new machines, you can get a 15-inch MacBook Pro with maximum RAM and the best processor for $3,499, or a 13-inch model for $2,499, which is just a few hundred dollars more expensive than similar upgrades cost last year rather than a few thousand.

Most users won't need 4TB of storage, but it's a good option to have for those professional users who do need the extra capacity.

Apple's new MacBook Pros with customizations will be delivered starting on July 18 with the fastest shipping according to Apple's website, while stock configurations will be delivered starting on July 16. The new machines will be available in Apple retail stores later this week.
Apple today released new 2018 MacBook Pro with Touch Bar models that feature "improved" and "quieter" third-generation keyboards, but it's unclear if issues with sticky or unresponsive keys have been addressed.


TechCrunch's Brian Heater:
I can say definitively that the keyboard is noticeably quieter than its predecessor. I wasn't able to get a side by side comparison yet… but as someone who uses a Pro with the second-gen keyboard every day, I can confirm that the improvement is immediately apparent.

Otherwise, there's really no difference with the new keyboards from a mechanical perspective. The butterfly switches are the same, and they offer the same amount of key travel as their predecessors. The company won’t actually say what it's done here to lower the clickity-clack… but it's certainly an improvement.
Heater speculates that Apple may not have had enough lead time to completely redesign the keyboard on the 2018 MacBook Pro, as despite years of anecdotal complaints, the situation only developed into a furor more recently.

iMore's Rene Ritchie is more optimistic that Apple hopefully reengineered the keyboards to have improved reliability:
There is a new keyboard. Or rather, newish. It's a 3rd generation Butterfly and Dome switch set up. That's not what scissor-key fans are going to want to hear, but Apple believes it's a better, more stable, more precise overall typing experience and is sticking with it.

It's been reengineered though, and while I'm sure — or at least I desperately hope — reliability will improve — the major focus was on reducing the loudness. That, according to Apple, has been some of the most intense feedback the company has gotten over the new keyboards.
The Verge's Dieter Bohn, however, says the third-generation keyboard "wasn't designed to solve those issues," based on what Apple told him during a press briefing for the new MacBook Pro earlier this week.
This new third-generation keyboard wasn't designed to solve those issues, Apple says. In fact, company representatives strenuously insisted that the keyboard issues have only affected a tiny, tiny fraction of its user base…

When we asked Apple representatives at the event exactly how the keyboard was changed to make it quieter, they declined to specify.
That can be interpreted in two ways: either Apple has not made any structural changes to the keyboard to address the issues outlined in its service program, or it has and doesn't want to acknowledge it on the record.

Engadget's Dana Wollman also believes, based on Apple's information, that the "stability and precision of the keys remain unchanged":
As for the keyboard, it's supposedly quieter. Though I had a few minutes to play with it in my demo this week, I'm not ready to pass any sort of judgment. For one thing, I never thought the MacBook Pro keyboard was that loud to begin with, and when I had a chance to try it this week there was no opportunity to do a side-by-side test. It does appear, based on everything Apple has said, that the stability and precision of the keys remain unchanged.
MacRumors reached out to Apple for clarification, but we did not immediately receive a response. We'll update if we hear back.

For context, following years of anecdotal complaints from customers, and a few class action lawsuits, Apple initiated a worldwide service program last month, offering free repairs of 2015-and-later MacBook and 2016-and-later MacBook Pro keyboards, which have low-profile butterfly switch mechanisms.

We've already reported about the service program in more detail, but the gist is that affected MacBook and MacBook Pro models can experience issues with sticky, unresponsive, or inconsistently functioning keys when small particles like dust or crumbs get stuck underneath the shallow keycaps.

Teardowns and extended usage of the 2018 MacBook Pro keyboards should reveal whether the issues have been fully addressed.